Read Electric Barracuda by Tim Dorsey Online

electric-barracuda

“Dorsey differs from writers such as Carl Hiassen, James Hall, and Elmore Leonard…These guys fire bullets. Dorsey makes sure his gun is filled with hollow-point.”—Sarasota Herald TribuneReaders who can’t get enough of lovable serial killer Serge A. Storms can rejoice. He’s back in Electric Barracuda—the latest outrageous romp through the Sunshine State by Tim Dorsey, maste“Dorsey differs from writers such as Carl Hiassen, James Hall, and Elmore Leonard…These guys fire bullets. Dorsey makes sure his gun is filled with hollow-point.”—Sarasota Herald TribuneReaders who can’t get enough of lovable serial killer Serge A. Storms can rejoice. He’s back in Electric Barracuda—the latest outrageous romp through the Sunshine State by Tim Dorsey, master of the zany crime thriller. This time Serge is a fugitive running from the police, and murder and mayhem have never been more over-the-top hilarious. Tim Dorsey’s Electric Barracuda is not to be missed. The Miami Herald put it best: “Nobody, but nobody, writes like this guy.”...

Title : Electric Barracuda
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9780062041593
Format Type : ebook
Number of Pages : 384 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Electric Barracuda Reviews

  • Tim
    2019-03-28 19:49

    As usual, some rib tickling moments provided by Dorsey, especially at the outset and interspersed occasionally. The ending could have been better. 6 of 10 stars

  • H R Koelling
    2019-04-08 23:38

    As with any Tim Dorsey book I read, I devour it as fast as I can, sometimes staying up well past my bedtime and/or sneaking in a few quick pages while I'm watching porn, calibrating the plutonium rod mechanism at the nuclear power plant or showering. The adventures of Serge and Coleman are also the perfect complement to a few pitchers of beer with bong hit chasers. Not that I've done a bong hit in a few decades or attempted to drink a pitcher on my own lately, but I sometimes feel like I'm back in the woozy saddle of high times while reading his novels. The best way for me to describe Serge and Coleman, the dysfunctional OCD/ADD protagonists of Electric Barracuda, Dorsey's 13th installment in the continuing warped Florida adventures of this daft duo, would be to compare them to an Abbot and Costello meets Jake and Elwood Blues amalgamation infused with Hunter S. Thompson gonzo dystopian eclecticism wrapped in a devious Hannibal Lecter taste for the erudite and obscene. It's like skydiving without a parachute, blindfolded and on acid, terror-filled yet exciting, and landing on a massive soft pile of overweight circus clowns dressed in bright garish costumes wearing those crazy two-can holding beer helmets who all cram into a Mini Cooper to race across the sandy palm tree dotted landscape dodging brain-addled geriatric drivers flipping the bird and pissed off Humvee hulking tourists while contemplating Nietzsche and discussing the relative merits of TNT versus C4 while doing shots. It's exhilarating and it's frightening. There's never a dull moment.This book actually had a few more close calls than I'm used to from their other adventures. I kept thinking they were much closer to being caught than I was comfortable with, so I actually felt a bit nervous at times. The run-ins and near misses with their arch nemesis, Agent Mahoney, kept me on the edge of my seat. The totally unexpected revelation about Serge and Mahoney at the end of the book shocked me. I can't wait to see how Dorsey incorporates this into his future books.I didn't give this novel five stars because it just seemed a bit weaker than some of his other books. I can't really pinpoint why I feel this way, but it might have to do with some of the more improbable escapes and near misses of the bumbling entourage chasing Serge and Coleman. I thought the character of Doberman was hilarious. But let's hope the other epic bumblings of the poor character who never gets laid makes a return in the future, who I would compare to Doberman.And, despite the fact that these books are full of comic genius and hilarity, I'm also impressed by Tim Dorsey's intelligence and writing finesse. A discussion of male female relations was so perfect that it should be mandatory reading for every pimply-faced male teenager embarking on the rocky road of dating: "Let's get going," said Serge, heading into the woods. "That was a lucky clean break, no schmaltzy good-byes.""Didn't she tell you not to leave?" [Coleman asked]"Women always say that." Serge pushed through the branches. "But they actually WANT you to leave. They love that in a man."Coleman stepped over a log. "I thought they hated it.""They say they hate it, but inside they secretly want a rogue.""Are you a rogue?""No, but I play one in books." Serge hacked through more branches. "You show me a guy who does everything a woman wants, and I'll show you the same guy six months later, standing on the sidewalk, wondering why some asshole's toothbrush is in her bathroom where his used to be."And although I've never taken acid (LSD-25) before, although many of my close friends have described their experiences to me in vivid detail, Coleman's description of bad acid versus good acid, that begins chapter six, is priceless:"Good acid's totally different. Took some killer windowpane last year, and first got pissed because it wasn't working and I thought I'd been ripped off, and I'm playing with my zipper, up and down and up and down, hearing sounds of individual prongs locking and unlocking in musical scales like a xylophone, and the mechanism starts blowing my mind and I think: Hey, a lot of planning went into this motherfucker. So I took off my pants to get a closer look, zipping up and down in front of my face. Even more impressive! LSD's like that, always giving you a new perspective, especially when the pants are over your head, and you're looking OUT through the zipper: up, down, up, down, each time giving me a peek through the crotch to the tune of "Jungle Boogie." And you know how sometimes you just get this paranoid feeling on excellent drugs that someone's watching you? It was like that this time, except multiplied by a hundred, probably because I was in a restaurant. Suddenly all these people began screaming, and I thought maybe some customer had gone berserk, and I crawled under the table. Then suddenly the table went straight up in the air! I'm thinking, holy fuck, what kind [of] crazy McDonald's is this? Turns out some employees had lifted the table and grabbed me and then I was on the sidewalk in my underwear and some pants hit me in the face, and I went back to the motel and kept working the zipper, wondering about the person who invented it, and I finally nod to myself: Yeah, now this guy really had his shit wired tight--he could see the big picture. And I hid under the bed and played with the zipper for the next six hours until the trip wore off. Now, THAT'S good acid."It's boyish, it's irreverent, it's entertaining and it's meant to be nothing more. But in the hands of this gifted writer who has created memorable and well developed characters, it's just what Tim Dorsey's many fans expect from these humorous books. Thank you, sir. May I have another?

  • Giovanni Gelati
    2019-04-07 15:38

    I have some business to get out of the way first before I bow in front of the Serge and Coleman altar to which I pay homage. Yes, I love the characters and Tim Dorsey is an amazing author; he delivers yet another novel to which I have caused stress to my diaphragm from too much laughing and my face still hurts from too much smiling. But I digress yet again. Here is the news, well at least some of it; I have way too much to pop it all in today. The deal is this: Check out the GZONE blogtalk radio show and The Novel Spot. Wednesday I have Vincent Zandri on the show at 12.30pmEST & then on Thursday Steve Berry jumps into The GZONE @ 10amEST. I make no bones about the fact that I am a Malone Clone and am excited about both interviews. Mr. Zandri is one of Kindle’s hottest authors right now with THREE, count them –THREE, novels in the TOP 100 there. And Steve Berry is well, Steve Berry, NYT bestselling author of numerous novels. Visit the Novel Spot to get in a quick word on what is a fun new place for authors and readers alike. On the Gelati’s Scoop home page push the badge and join, it is free, it is fun, and I think it is going to be a happening place. Check it out, be entertained, be involved, and have fun. If you cannot call into the show and have a question for the authors, drop me a line and I will ask for you, then catch the archives to hear it. Oh yeah, here is the call in number for The GZONE blogtalk radio show:1-949-270-5955. I look forward to hearing from you! Now to our novel, Electric Barracuda! I did say I liked it, no change that I loved it. I am a true fan of Dorsey and his work, his style and the substance he brings to the table with these characters. Besides that I am a sucker for all that is Florida. For some reasons his novels have been dropped around this time of year and I get to read them as it snows or in the case of the last storm-ice, snow and then slush. Yummy stuff when you are reading about the beautiful state of Florida. What is between the covers this time you may ask, I am about to hit you with it:“Serge Storms, that loveable thermonuclear vigilante and one-stop-Florida-trivia-shop, has been leaving corpses strewn across the Sunshine State for more than a decade. The authorities—especially one tenacious state agent—have begun to notice the exponential body count, and send a police task force to track down Serge. Could his luck finally have run out?Meanwhile, armed with his perpetually baked sidekick, Coleman, Serge decides to blitz the state and resurrect his Internet travel-advice website—which, of course, must be the finest and the final word on trekking the Sunshine State. To up the ante, Serge concocts a theme vacation for his cyberspace audience. And that theme? You, too, can experience Florida through the eyes of a fugitive.Off they go blogging along a getaway route through the state's most remote bayous, back roads, and bars, where the number of cadavers begin stacking up like Serge's website hits. And in the middle of all his make-believe close brushes, Serge finally wises up to his pursuers and realizes that the manic gumball rally is genuinely on "in the tradition of the great American chase movie."Clues and questions mount:Who are all the women being photographed naked in the swamp?What made Coleman draw on his face with magic markers?Where is the cruise-to-nowhere taking its drunk prisoners?When was the last time a Civil War reenactment involved a sports car?But Serge also has some personal business to tidy up. His grandfather's old Miami Beach gang suddenly had their life savings wiped out, and there's a good bet it was no accident. Too much action for Serge to juggle? Not when it all dovetails nicely into his Secret Master Plan. And especially if it involves Serge's favorite new obsession: tracking Al Capone's little-known escapades in the Everglades.”To my followers, well first off thank you I appreciate it very much, you know I like to be entertained when I read; it is one of the most important factors for me in the read. Electric Barracuda delivers entertainment in spades and then some. I laughed so hard at times I cried, my wife was giving me funny looks, but then asked what I was reading, when I told her she just shook her head and murmured something unintelligible. She knows how I get when I read one of these novels: basically she keeps her distance and lets me zone into the gonzo side of me. Is this novel for everyone, no, probably not? If you can throw a few things out the window and just put a few other things aside and let go, then yeah, have a good time, a very good time. Tim Dorsey has an amazing sense of humor, which I can say is not to be missed. Take the ride through Florida with Serge and Coleman, they rock. What are you reading today? Have you checked out our new blogtalk radio show The GZONE? Check us out and become our friend on Shelfari, The Novel Spot &Twitter. Go to Goodreads and become our friend there and suggest books for us to read and post on. Did you know you can shop directly on Amazon by clicking the Amazon Banner on our blog? Thanks for stopping by today; We will see you tomorrow. Have a great day. http://www.gelatisscoop.blogspot.com

  • Charlie
    2019-04-11 15:49

    Imagine a mash-up of MTV's iconic Beavis and Butthead meets gumshoe noir on a crazy trip through the set of Miami Vice (the Everglade years). This is one badass, non-stop thrill ride that will have you zigzagging all over the state of Florida. Who else can master dark comedy, crime thriller and state history better than Tim Dorsey? Electric Barracuda is a shining example of classic absurdist fiction. It focuses on the experiences of characters and their seemingly meaningless actions and events. By making use of dark humor, abasement of reason and bizarre philosophy, Dorsey opens a peep hole into American culture. The characters are amusing, fully-developed, inventive and most of all, the events are a fast-paced blast that will have the reader laughing until they weep (and then questioning whether the author was sober at any stage of the writing process). Of course, in this case, it's a good thing. An untamed ride ensues mingling past and present, which are in continual conflict. This instigates an appeal to the nature vs. nurture theory (I'll let readers chew on that for a while). To say this is just a satire is too simplistic and would be a crime against literature and possibly a felony against humanity. Did I go too far? True of most absurdist fiction, Electric Barracuda is deeply thematic and creatively communicative. The moral is not explicit and allows the reader to reflect and come to their own conclusion. The world is a dirty, gritty place and doing something wrong for the right reasons is so very forgivable and enduring. Tim Dorsey has earned his way onto my fan shelf. I'll be reading more twisted tales by this author soon.

  • Ross Cavins
    2019-04-06 23:38

    I have never read a Tim Dorsey novel but being a Carl Hiaasen fan, he was recommended to me. I must say that I was not disappointed.Dorsey has a similar style and wit to Hiaasen, but his delivery is much dryer, almost British in a way. Because his style is so different, I had trouble getting into the characters in the beginning.That being said, once I figured out the two main characters' personalities were sarcastic most of the time, I began to get sucked in.And while I lacked the character history of this obviously mid-series novel, I thoroughly enjoyed it. Dorsey did a great job of introducing them to me without subjecting me to "repeat material." He did what you're supposed to do, work in the backstory little by little.Dorsey has given me another star to shoot for in my own writing.While I won't give this book five stars, I'll say this: I bought another Tim Dorsey novel to read. That should sum up my review perfectly.

  • Glenn
    2019-04-08 18:47

    If it's January, I can be assured of two things, snow, and another annual installment in the continuing Serge hijinks by Tim Dorsey. I could do without the snow, but not without the next chapter in the weirdness that is Serge. It was one frenetic romp, the whole book being fast paced, with Serge and Coleman being tracked by several different authorities, including a state agent named Mahoney (a recurring character in the series), the police, SWAT teams, and a cable TV show bounty hunter. Dorsey is king of the comedic mystery. Of course, now I have to wait ANOTHER WHOLE YEAR for my next Serge fix! Finishing the latest Serge book is always bittersweet.

  • Jeanne
    2019-03-27 20:43

    I think this was the funniest Serge A Storms story to date! It seemed I was laughing more than any other story in the series. We meet some new friends: Seymour Bunsen (or is he/she really new??) and Mikey (who provides many of the laughs). And then there is Serge's crazy ex, Molly, who returns like the proverbial bad penny! Serge sets out to right a wrong done to the old gang . . . is he successful? You'll just have to read, and laugh, to find out! 8 out of 10.

  • Derek Dowell
    2019-04-12 17:25

    If you like Tim Dorsey and his Florida travelogue adventures starring homicidal vigilante, Serge Storms, and substance abusing sidekick, Coleman, then you probably knew the date and time Electric Barracuda would be released long before it hit the shelves. But if Dorsey's thinly plotted, hyperactive tales aren't your cup of tea – well – don't say we didn't warn you. Like midget bowling during spring break in Panama City Beach, this kind of writing can be polarizing. To Tim's credit, you know exactly what you're in for with each Serge book. Over 13 books he's never broken formula and this one is no different.Story:Electric Barracuda finds Serge and Coleman ripping around Florida again, this time testing out their latest brainchild, a fugitive style tourist service, where clients get to experience the Sunshine State as if they were on the lam. As usual, the pair are pursued by a variety of law enforcement types, especially Serge's nemesis, Agent Mahoney. Regular readers have come to expect a barrage of Floridiana and Dorsey doesn't disappoint. Join Serge as he plows through the Everglades, Myakka River State Park, Cedar Key, and more, dispensing a few baddies with creative verve along the way. Prepare yourself for two startling developments in Serge's personal life, one which turns out to be a sham and the other perhaps more far-reaching.Characters:As a rule, if you find yourself identifying with any character in a Tim Dorsey novel, run, don't walk to the nearest psychiatrist and get medicinal help pronto! This is not about depth and development and back story. This is about mayhem, plain and simple. Still, after so many books, I'm somewhat nervous to admit the formula hasn't worn thin yet. I always look forward to the next with great anticipation.Writing:As a former news reporter for the Tampa Tribune, it's no surprise to find Dorsey's prose lean, tight, and firmly tilted away from flowery description. His command of the language is not as poetic as fellow Florida scribe Carl Hiaasen, but what he lacks in vocabulary, he more than makes up for with crazed situations. Plot? Don't need one. Not really. Not when the chain of events you group together and call a book is this much fun.The Bottom Line:If you've never drunk the Serge Kool-Aid before, you might be better served to go to Amazon and read a sample before plopping down your hard-earned cash. You might like it or you might hate it. One small complaint. The ebook sells for $9.99, which is a completely ridiculous price, though one the major publishers seem intent on clinging to. I look with great suspicion at any digital book priced above five bucks, though, as a long-time Serge reader, hold my nose and pay the price. Also, if you've never listened to a Dorsey book on audio, you might give it a shot. For some reason, his writing really works well in this format.

  • Amy Corwin
    2019-04-10 20:35

    This was my first introduction to Tim Dorsey's crimnally insane character, Serge Storms and his stoner partner, Coleman, and I have to say, I loved it. The story was fast-paced, satrical, oft-times completely outrageous (and inappropriate), and if you don't have a fondness for serial killers who invent new ways of killing people who really do need a-killing, then you may not enjoy this. But I have a seriously UN-P.C. side and found myself laughing until it hurt.One of the things that I liked best was the variety of sub-plots that eventually twine together and mesh at the end. There was so much going on, and it came together so well, that I was pretty much in giggling awe by the end.So what was it about? A lot of things. Serge Storms is on the run from the law, and while on the move, he's blogging. You see he has this brilliant new idea: a guide for adventurous tourists who want to see something other than Disneyesque attractions. A guide for serial killers, on the run. Or anyone on the run from the law. Or anyone just plain crazy.In the meantime, Serge and Coleman are being pursued by the law. Apparently, the law in Florida comes in a range of talent from the completely incompetant to the wildly nutso. Often the nutters are the only ones who have a clue. I particularly liked Agent Mahoney who pretty much believes he's a detective out of the 1940's, complete with a fedora.I'm not going to go into excrutiating detail about the plot. It's too complex to give it justice. Suffice to say, it's fast and incredibly funny, but beware, it can be gruesome (but only in a humorous way, of course). You have to enjoy black humor to "get it".I do. I got it. I loved it. I'm looking for the next one.

  • David
    2019-04-16 21:43

    Tim Dorsey's 13th outing of the most lovable serial killer, Serge Storms, is among the best in the series. This time, Serge is back on his blog offering Florida visitors and natives his Fugitive Tour - through the backroads and rare sites. He decides to test out his route and techniques for avoiding getting caught by pretending to be a fugitive. Good for him that it works, since his arch-nemesis Mahoney along with other Florida agents are right on his tail. This book is loaded with twists, much more of Serge's inventive executions of child molesters, wildlife poachers and others you're at least tempted to kill yourself. There is the great behind-the-scenes Florida history, the usual characters, Serge's too-fast-for-you personality, and some scenes where you will need to put down the book to stop laughing before continuing. There are also cameo appearances from Florida authors Randy Wayne White and Brad Meltzer. If you are reading this thinking this sounds great, it is...but not for everyone. If you are easily offended, I'd stay away from this series. Reading Tim Dorsey is a bit like watching Quentin Tarantino, only Dorsey is much funnier.

  • John Hood
    2019-04-10 21:49

    Two-Fisted and TwistedTim Dorsey Kicks Out Another Feisty Piece of Florida FictionJohn HoodSunPost Weekly February 3, 2011http://bit.ly/eLf8lOTim Dorsey’s hyperreal crime fictions have always tripled as road guides for anyone looking to see what’s left of what once was in this fabled state of ours. In fact, he told me last year more than a few folks use a highlighter while reading his books and then hit the road so they can hang at the hotspots he’s covered. But Dorsey’s interests are in all things Floridiana, not just the places. And in Electric Barracuda (William Morrow $24.99) the attributively-obsessed wordslinger also swingingly cites more of the sounds, words and visions that have made our state so great for ingrates and non-ingrates alike.Word-wise, a lot of the regal regulars are included, from Marjory Stoneman Douglas, the Grand Dame of the Everglades (her The Everglades: River of Grass should be required reading for anyone with a Florida address — or a conscience), to the peripatetic Peter Mathiessen (who’s Watson Trilogy makes the 10,000 islands even more mythic than they already were). Crime scribe Charles Willeford gets cited too (read the Hoke Moseley quartet before you die — or else), as does the wily Randy Wayne White, who makes a “masculine” cameo (his latest Doc Ford longplayer, Night Vision, racks at the end of February). There’s even a solid nod to Susan Orleans’ The Orchid Thief, which of course chronicles the the exploits of John Laroche and a group of his Seminole pals, who poached the Fakahatchee Strand State Preserve in order to find and clone the rare Ghost Orchid.But it’s #1 New York Times bestseller author Brad Meltzer who Dorsey really takes to task, and his being cast as an underhanded (and underwhelming) attorney is so far against type it simply has to be for laughs.Cinematically, Dorsey undusts Nicholas Ray’s 1958 Wind Across the Everglades (which starred Burl Ives, Christopher Plummer and Gypsy Rose Lee) and Victor Nuñez’s 1997 Ulee’s Gold (which featured Peter Fonda and was set on the grounds of the Lanier family, a third-generation beekeeping clan in Wewahitchka, Florida). And for songs Dorsey sings us both “Orange Blossom Special” (Ervin T. Rouse’s and Robert “Chubby” Wise’s 1938 ditty, which is based on the same-named train, has long been considered “the fiddler’s national anthem”) and “Tamiami Trail” (a 1926 rarity, written by Cliff Friend & Joseph H. Santly, that predates the coast-linking road’s opening by two years).Though these cultural pepperings pair nicely with the salt of the earth itself (‘Cuda goes, among other places, from Lucky Cole’s on Loop Road and the Everglades City Rod and Gun Club, up to Snook Haven and Warm Mineral Springs in dear ol’ Sarasota), neither citings nor visitations would amount to more than a list of oddities (albeit a rather robust one) were it not for the story. And in this case, like a dozen other cases before it, the story is as mad and as bad and as dangerous as you’d want it to be — only more so.As you might suspect, the story involves Dorsey’s uber creation Serge A. Storms and his perennially stoned sidekick Coleman. Like their previous exploits, the dynamite-fused duo are up to doing bad to those who do no good to others (well, Storms is anyway; Coleman’s simply along for the wild ride). This time however the backdrop is a Fugitive Tour the likes of which even the ever elusive Dr. Richard Kimble might never have escaped. Come to think of it, that brooding ‘60s TV hit series seems to be the trigger that pulls Storms and Coleman into their reeling orbit, and like all circular things it comes to no dead end.Well, no dead ends for our anti-heroes, that is, who continue to leave both a coast-to-coast trail of corpses and their pursuers in their very wide wake. Or do they? An enlightened mind might see Storms’ Fugitive Tour as the blogging equivalent of tea leaves. And if his arch nemesis Mahoney can keep his specs on, Storms could just post himself and his partner right into the hoosegow.Then again, after getting away with many multiples of murders over the course of a dozen sordid stories, there’s gotta be some consequence. I mean, even the most ruthlessly efficient serial killers eventually get caught, don’t they?I don’t know. And I wouldn’t tell you if I did. Because to spill the beans would mean you’d only have the trip to look forward to. And as crazy as that trip may be, it’s always better if you don’t know just where – or even if – it’s ever gonna stop.Buckle-up, baby!

  • Sandie Herron
    2019-04-03 16:26

    Strange, weird, wacky, homicidal, passionate, talkative, obsessed, wild, odd, eerie, and bizarre Serge A. Storms is so in love with Florida and its history that he has now started something that only Serge could do – plan a tour of Florida from a fugitive’s viewpoint.Here’s a quote that might help you understand Serge a bit more; he’s telling his half-baked sidekick Coleman about his new venture. Serge reminds Coleman of the website he started a while back; he’d started the site because no one else was giving tourists reports like his, ones that said which hookers to trust, what type of maneuvers to do if you are carjacked, things people needed to know but were too afraid to ask. He’s taken that idea one step further: “I’m adding theme vacations … like theme parks without the parks…. Florida is a theme park, and the theme is weirdness…. My first theme vacation: the ‘tourist fugitive.’ You come down here and pretend to be on the lam.”If you have read any of the previous twelve books by Tim Dorsey that include serial killer Serge Storms, you know that Serge is absolutely ideal to pull this off. When Coleman asks Serge why “normal” people would want to experience Florida on the lam, Serge replies, “Because it’s the best way to experience the finest parts of our state, which is the underbelly.” What even Serge doesn’t acknowledge is that he really IS on the lam. The equally obsessed FDLE agent Mahoney has been chasing Serge for years and has tracked him to within minutes of his last known location. He’s wild to nail Serge, and his enthusiasm is catching. The Florida Department of Law Enforcement designed a task force to catch the maniac who has killed lowlife criminals and reprobates that society would otherwise be happy to be without. The two task force members hook up with Mahoney just back on active duty after a mental breakdown put him on leave. Of course this story isn’t so simple as Serge and Coleman running from Florida dive to dump. Certain people from portions of Serge’s history we’ve been privileged to share via these books are revisited. Don’t fret if you haven’t read any or all of these entries because Tim Dorsey seamlessly weaves whatever background material you need to know together with present day material. I must offer a disclaimer (I guess any Floridian reviewer must); I live in one of the cities Serge went through in this current volume of Florida history, and I’m sure it influenced my review.Serge isn’t really all bad. Every so often he and Coleman get “legitimate” jobs because “an honest day’s work will cleanse the palate …” In this escapade, er, book, they work at a suicide hotline, to start, but are fired on their first day for reasons I’m sure you can imagine and I won’t spoil for you. Intertwined with blog entries about the fugitive tour stops, Serge also has some personal business to handle. Those who remain from his grandfather’s old South Beach gang have discovered that their personal savings have been moved offshore where they can’t access the funds. Plus Serge’s new obsession is tracking Al Capone’s escapades in the Everglades. Don’t worry; I can’t tell you how, but Serge thinks he has it all worked out. Everything is part of his secret Master Plan. .Tim Dorsey can take everyday news clippings, stir in a little imagination, a history lesson or two, shake together and out drops Serge’s next story. Dorsey effortlessly captures Serge’s frenetic energy and Coleman’s laid-back styles. Mayhem ensues. Next thing you know we have a modern “It’s a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World.” Dorsey delivers another Florida madcap mystery.

  • Joyce
    2019-03-22 18:51

    Summary: Serge Storms, that lovable thermonuclear vigilante and one stop Florida trivia shop, has been leaving corpses strewn across the Sunshine State for more than a decade. The authorities, especially one tenacious state agent, have begun to notice the exponential body count, and send a police task force to track down Serge. Could his luck finally have run out? Meanwhile, armed with his perpetually baked sidekick, Coleman, Serge decides to blitz the state and resurrect his Internet travel advice website, which, of course, must be the finest and the final word on trekking the Sunshine State. To up the ante, Excellent crazy main characters. Summary: Serge concocts a theme vacation for his cyberspace audience. And that theme? You, too, can experience Florida through the eyes of a fugitive. Off they go blogging along a getaway route through the state's most remote bayous, back roads, and bars, where the number of cadavers begin stacking up like Serge's website hits. And in the middle of all his make believe close brushes, Serge finally wises up to his pursuers and realizes that the manic gumball rally is genuinely on "in the tradition of the great American chase movie." Clues and questions mount: Who are all the women being photographed naked in the swamp? What made Coleman draw on his face with magic markers? Where is the cruise to nowhere taking its drunk prisoners? When was the last time a Civil War reenactment involved a sports car? But Serge also has some personal business to tidy up. His grandfather's old Miami Beach gang suddenly had their life savings wiped out, and there's a good bet it was no accident. Too much action for Serge to juggle? Not when it all dovetails nicely into his Secret Master Plan. And especially if it involves Serge's favorite new obsession: tracking Al Capone's little known escapades in the Everglades. So gas up the car, say good bye to the relatives, and join Serge on the lam as he drives straight for the deepest bowels of Florida to unravel the final mysteries of Electric Barracuda. -- From publisher.

  • Bob Reiss
    2019-04-03 17:49

    Electric Barracuda is the 13th novel featuring the wild and wacky Florida Serial killer Serge A. Storms. After 13 novels, you would expect a wide variety of situation, no matter how madcap, allowing you to get a glimpse of the ever changing demented mind. Well, we might as well be expecting free healthcare and lower taxes. With Serge, you basically get the same basic thing. Serge and Coleman dashing from one interesting Florida locale to another, telling a lot of the same jokes and doing a lot of the same insane (for Serge) and self destructive (for Coleman) stuff. Along the way Serge will come up with ever elaborate ways to kill the scum that seems to float to the top of the Sunshine State. Eventually, you’d think it would get old.Well, it hasn’t yet. A Serge novel is like the worlds most amazing rollercoaster that you can ride when ever you want, but, once a year they make it even better. Yeah, Dorsey throws in some plot device that encourages Serge to do his thing, In Electric Barracuda, Serge is traveling throughout Florida blogging about his latest idea, Fugitive Tours, which will allow you to see Florida as you would if you were running from the law. While doing this, he is unknowingly being chased by the law. Along with that you have a corrupt lawyer, Mahoney still stuck in his noir fantasy world, a mystery man, Mikey (a special guest on his journey) and a big surprise for Serge. Oh, and Coleman drinks, and takes the orange pill.To make things even better, Oliver Wyman again performs the reading for the audiobook. Wyman handles a hell of a load taking on Serge and it truly is a marvel. His performance not only does the material justice, but I would argue makes the book even better. If you have only read a Serge Novel, and haven’t had the chance to experience it in audiobook form, then I urge you, take a chance and listen. You haven’t truly experienced the world of Tim Dorsey’s creation, until you have heard it read by Oliver Wyman.

  • Elizabeth A.
    2019-04-14 18:25

    Serge Storms is a severely in need of medication serial killer who roams the state of Florida with his perpetually stoned sidekick Coleman in tow dispensing “justice” to anyone who offends his moral sensibilities. This dynamic-duo from Hell is rude, crude, and couldn’t find socially acceptable with a preprogrammed Garmin and a month to get there.Where we do find ourselves in Electric Barracuda is dropped into the middle of Serge’s latest scheme: offering theme vacations on his travel blog. After all, as Serge points out to Coleman, “Florida is a theme park, and the theme is weirdness.” Serge is calling his particular brand of weirdness the “Tourist Fugitive” package, with the idea being to lure people to Florida for a vacation where they pretend to be on the lam from the law, visiting the fascinating “underbelly” of the state in the process.And visit the underbelly we do, as Serge and Coleman pinball from Kissimmee to the coast to deep into the alligator infested Everglades, all while pursued by the Florida Department of Law Enforcement, a motorcycle driving KISS music blaring reality-TV bounty hunter called the Doberman, and a mysterious woman in a T-Bird convertible among others. Along the way Serge manages to find time to act as the judge, jury, and creative executioner (don’t let this man near a Home Depot) for a handful of crooks and criminals who have the misfortune to cross his path.Serge’s near constant state of manic behavior, and a heaping helping of attention deficit disorder, combined with Coleman’s drug induced cluelessness makes for a rather gonzo style of storytelling that can be somewhat disorienting initially if you’re not familiar with it. But if you’re brave enough to choose the red pill and take a trip into Tim Dorsey’s “Storms matrix” I promise you’ll have the trip of your life.

  • Alison
    2019-04-05 16:37

    I may be late getting to this series by Tim Dorsey, but I am an instant fan! Never will you meet a more likable and hilarious serial killer. Serge Storms is a tour guide of sorts, yet as he travels around Florida unknowingly running from the law, he makes the state a little safer for the rest of us.Serge, along with his sidekick, Coleman, take their website readers on a new adventure - Fugitive on the Run - for people who want to "pretend" to be outlaws, like Arnold Schwartzenegger in Total Recall. As they make their way along little known roads and outposts criss-crossing their way across the Everglades, they dodge Serge's arch nemesis, formerly retired Special Agent Mahoney. Mahoney, Serge and Coleman, along with the most outrageous cast of characters you will ever meet, are each hysterically funny and vividly drawn. Tim Dorsey has a rhythm so unique, I am only upset I didn't discover his writing sooner.This is a hilarious ride! I found myself guffawing aloud in the most inconvenient of places - doctor's waiting rooms, on the exercise bike at physical therapy, in the library. I think everyone around me was jealous that I had a hysterical book while they were listening to boring Lady Gaga on their iPods. I have to tell you, Electric Barracuda is not the first in the series, and while I wished that I had started it from the beginning, this book can be read as a stand alone. That being said, I can't wait for the next one! In the meantime, I am going back to the beginning. This may just be my new favorite, highly recommended series!Move over, Stephanie Plum, get ready to share your shelf with Serge Storms!

  • Dianne
    2019-04-06 21:35

    Serge is back and in full cruisin’ mode. In this chapter of his life, he is blogging about a “fugitive themed vacation” and plotting the best getaway routes for vacationers with an edge, to enjoy. Of course, this being a Serge and Coleman novel means that along the way death and mayhem of the most humorous kind follow in their footsteps. In addition, of course, this being Serge means that mixed in with all the mayhem will be something personal…something that won’t be clear to us the readers until the very end and boy oh boy this is a biggie. A secret that I never saw coming. I enjoyed this book but I am sad to say not as much as I have enjoyed the earlier ones. I don’t know if I feel that the mayhem is getting too crazy, (but is there really such a thing as too crazy with Serge though?) or if the body count is getting too high for me, or if some of the scenarios are starting to feel a little over-used, I don’t know whatever it is I just know that I hope the next book goes off in a slightly different fresher direction than this one. Actually,, from the bomb dropped in this book, I would say that this could be a distinct possibility!I loved the glimpses into Serge’s childhood and the secondary (tertiary?) plot with Serge obsessing over Al Capone and Al’s hidden loot.This is definitely one of the most important books for those of us who have been reading about Serge and Coleman from the start.

  • Dianne
    2019-04-20 15:26

    Serge is back and in full cruisin’ mode. In this chapter of his life, he is blogging about a “fugitive themed vacation” and plotting the best getaway routes for vacationers with an edge, to enjoy. Of course, this being a Serge and Coleman novel means that along the way death and mayhem of the most humorous kind follow in their footsteps. In addition, of course, this being Serge means that mixed in with all the mayhem will be something personal…something that won’t be clear to us the readers until the very end and boy oh boy this is a biggie. A secret that I never saw coming. I enjoyed this book but I am sad to say not as much as I have enjoyed the earlier ones. I don’t know if I feel that the mayhem is getting too crazy, (but is there really such a thing as too crazy with Serge though?) or if the body count is getting too high for me, or if some of the scenarios are starting to feel a little over-used, I don’t know whatever it is I just know that I hope the next book goes off in a slightly different fresher direction than this one. Actually,, from the bomb dropped in this book, I would say that this could be a distinct possibility!I loved the glimpses into Serge’s childhood and the secondary (tertiary?) plot with Serge obsessing over Al Capone and Al’s hidden loot.This is definitely one of the most important books for those of us who have been reading about Serge and Coleman from the start

  • Steve Auerweck
    2019-03-28 18:49

    I'm not sure if simply >liking< Tim Dorsey's Serge Storms novels could get one diagnosed with a psychological disorder, but hey, if that's wrong I don't want to be right.In this outing, the somewhat psychopathic Serge and his burned-out sidekick Coleman make their way to some of the most remote corners of Florida as Serge tells his blog readers how to have an exciting vacation, traveling like a fugitive. Unbeknownst to him, he's actually being pursued.As in many of the previous outings, Dorsey's/Serge's love for Florida's oddball history results in a madcap novel that's half tour guide, stopping in at classic historic bars and inns and remote islands. Along the way they encounter unbelievably twisted and fanciful characters, like Lucky Cole, possibly so named because his job is being paid by women to take their nude photos. What's that you say? You just checked Google and Lucky Cole is a real, live person? Well, so much the better, and even luckier for him that he landed in a novel with Serge. (Florida mystery writer Randy Wayne White makes a cameo, too.)As a bonus, there's a running subplot that flashes us back to Al Capone running a speakeasy operation in the middle of the Everglades. This is one of Serge's best outings; I was giggling throughout. But if you're new to the series, I'd suggest finding some of the earlier books first. They aren't strictly chronological but it's good to learn the characters and their backstories.

  • Paul Pessolano
    2019-03-26 22:44

    I wait with baited breath for the next installment from Tim Dorsey.Serge A. Storms is back in "Electric Barracuda" and again treats the reader to Florida history and sustained mayhem.Serge is again being pursued by his nemesis Mahoney and a group of police officers are spread out across the State of Florida. Serge, in his uncanny way, is able to escape the clutches fo the law time and time again. It is amazing how Tim Dorsey puts Serge in impossible situations and finds a way for him to escape.Remeber, Serge want to quit killing people, but as he says, "God put so many people on earth that need to be killed". He also finds a way of only killing the bad guys, and better than that he finds new and inventive ways of doing it. Many times their punishment is in direct relation to their crime."Electric Barracuda" has a couple of very different turns that give Serge some pause for reflection. Molly, is estranged wife, drops off a child that is quite possibly Serge's son. He seems to be a "chip off the old block" and is forever in trouble or in the way.Serge also discovers that Mahoney, who has been pursuing him for years, may not be the person Serge thought he was.Another wild romp through the "Sunshine State" that will have reader turning pages furiously and wishing the book would never end.The reader, when finished, will wait anxiously for the next installment of the Serge A. Storms story.

  • Carol
    2019-03-30 18:47

    This is a comic crime car chase fantasy ofribald mayhem! I've seldom been at such a loss to describe a book, but then, I've never read a story quite like this. Serge A. Storms and Coleman, his sidekick are racing all over the state of Florida in whatever transport that works for the particular bind they are in that day. This is a wild, wild ride on a boat to Cedar Key, a historic train ride, a glide down the Myakka River and car escapes through St.Petersburg and other towns. Tim Dorsey who has written fourteen sagas of Serge expresses a deep love of Florida in the dirt road and interstate settingsthat fly by the windows as the two fugitives flee from a convoy of police and a private eye known as The Doberman.This book is about rough men who use tough expletives and one who drinks and drugs himself stupid. This book is not for you if you are offended by coarse talk and situations. This character is wily and funny and the story is extremely funny and creative.This is a book that many people can't put down and I am looking forward to reading other books about Serge in this series. Tim Dorsey familiarizes readers with Florida in a way that may make some want to explore it forthemselves. As a female character says, any of the people who have been killed by Serge, truly needed a- killin.

  • Gail
    2019-04-17 16:50

    Serge Storms, hyperactive serial killer and Florida-phile, and his stoner friend Coleman return for another adventure. In Electric Barracuda Serge decides to pay homage to car chase movies, embarking on a fugitive tour of Florida. He and Coleman stay one step ahead of a gaggle of pursuers, including law enforcement officers, a Mystery Man, and The Doberman, who bears an uncanny resemblance to Dog the Bounty Hunter. It is particularly remarkable that they repeatedly elude capture, given that all of his pursuers are getting updates on his whereabouts from his website, where he details his activities and his plans. A second parallel storyline involves Al Capone's Everglades hideout and a search for his hidden treasure. Serge leads us all on a tour of the backwaters and obscure museums of southern Florida, giving us all a history lesson in very entertaining fashion. And along the way Serge finds inventive ways to kill a few people who deserve it. Electric Barracuda is great fun, as are all the novels in the series. I enjoyed Lowe and White, the new police officers introduced, and there are a couple of very interesting surprises near the end. Electric Barracuda made me want to go back and read the series all over again, and so I would have to say it is a very successful addition to the series.

  • mari
    2019-04-12 21:44

    Everyone is blogging these days, including Serge, the lovable serial killer of Tim Dorsey's novel, Electric Barracuda. Serge has an idea - a tourist romp through Florida as a fugitive. a In the process of "researching" for his website, he finds himself along with his sidekick, Coleman, truly on the run as Mahoney and some other bumbling detectives try to catch him. A fun and hilarious book which, it turns out, is part of a long running series. Who knew? Well, many people did except for me. This is the first book I have read- number 13 in the Serge A. Storms series- and I am surprised I hadn't heard of them before now. Having not read the previous books I was not as familiar with the characters as I should be. The story revolves around Serge and Coleman and knowing them would help immensely in understanding them, their relationship and appeal, as well as the detectives chasing them. Having said that, I still really enjoyed this tour of Florida through the characters' criminal eyes and I look forward to getting my hands on books 1-12. Here is the list of books for everyone else interested in reading this fun series:Florida RoadkillHammerhead Ranch Motel Orange Crush Triggerfish TwistThe Stingray ShuffleCadillac BeachTorpedo JuiceThe Big BambooHurricane PunchAtomic LobsterNuclear JellyfishGator A-Go-Go Electric Barracuda

  • Tom Croom
    2019-03-25 20:34

    Is this the best of the Serge Storms books? Nope... but it's still a damn good time.Tim Dorsey's books (for those of you that haven't read them) are 49% Florida history tour guides and 49% dark humor.The other 2% is usually a mystery of some sort.The mystery in this one centers around a legendary treasure left in the Everglades by Al Capone and Serge, Coleman and special guest "Mikey" make the rounds around the Sunshine State to lay the groundwork for a "Fugitive Tour" for Serge's blog. This book was a little heavier on the location focus than most of Dorsey's books, but it works to keep me interested in hitting up some of the places he mentioned. Things I got from this book:-The Nu Bamboo should have been a good idea. In real life, though, it wasn't. (Read my blog post about it.)-Lucky Cole is THE MAN.-I need/want to check out the old Al Capone location in the Glades one day.-Florida seems to have a high concentration of "interesting bars."-Tim Dorsey is not a fan of "Dog, The Bounty Hunter."Electric Barracuda is a good book made better (in my opinion) as a audio book enjoyed while on the road in Florida. Now if they would only go back an record his earlier novels...

  • Angela
    2019-03-29 18:38

    The Electric Barracuda is a rip roaring ride! You'll be riding along in the Barracuda with quirky serial killer Serge Storms & his stoner friend Coleman. They're on the uproarious run through Florida from law enforcement, a mystery man & the Doberman, who reminds you of a very clumsy Dog the Bounty Hunter.Not only will you go on the run with them through the Everglades while laughing out loud, you'll learn a little history of Florida as well! Like Al Capone's hideout. Though you would think you couldn't come to like a serial killer I certainly did! Not only because of his quirky antics, but he's not your typical serial killer! He runs across most unlikable people who, ironically, are out to harm others. This was a fast paced, laugh out loud, entertaining read. This is the first book I've ever read of Dorsey's & I can't wait to pick up the previous books in this series! Speaking of which...I found you don't have to have read the previous books to easily follow along with Dorsey's latest! I highly recommend this book & it has easily made it onto my list of favorite quick/entertaining reads!

  • Ron Arden
    2019-03-23 18:47

    Another great romp through Florida with Serge Storms. Serge always surprises and gives us a great history lesson in the process, but in this one, he gets a few surprises. Come to find out, Serge has a son. This kid is a holy terror. He chews through a leash at one point.Serge and Coleman decide to create the Fugitive's Tour of Florida. It's all chronicled on a blog and followers love it. Unfortunately for Serge, a Florida law enforcement task force and his old nemesis Mahoney are also following it. They are always just one step behind Serge, as he goes marauding all over the state.A secondary plot line is that Serge's grandfather's old gang needs to teach their sleazy lawyer a lesson. This involves finding a lost treasure that Al Capone buried in the Everglades in the 1920s. There are even flashbacks to those days to add to the fun.The ending of the book is a doozy and I loved it. There are always a few twists and turns in Dorsey's books, but this one beats them all.

  • Janet
    2019-04-09 18:40

    I am still laughing out loud. I never get enough of Serge and Coleman and I am never disappointed. Serge A. Storms is the most lovable and sexy serial killer out there. Everyone who ends up on the wrong side of Serge desperately deserves what they get. The creative way Serge doles out justice is pure genius. Once addicted to the Serge and Coleman ride whenever you walk through a home improvement store, and now a grocery store toy aisle (good gods no place is safe anymore!), one look at the most innocuous thing will have you laughing and thinking, I remember what Serge did with that. To this day, and how many books ago was it, shopping for towels is a chore. What with all the raised eyebrows and condescending smiles as if I'm a bit addled in the brain, just because I'm laughing when see or hold up a "guest towel". When I try to explain they cautiously back up, turn and run. Such is the life of a Dorsey fan.

  • Brett
    2019-03-28 15:33

    Tim Dorsey's Serge Storms novels are absolutely bizarrely unrealistic, yet the adventures keep coming, & I keep loving them. It doesn't get more escapist than this. Electric Barracuda feels like a first-class send-up of one of my favorite so-bad-it's-awesome movies, "Smokey & the Bandit." Serge & Coleman are on a seriously crazy pinball-machine paced tour of Florida again, this time in order to help Serge plan out the new theme of his Florida vacation planning scheme: the Florida fugitive tour. So they're doing it as if they, themselves, were on the run from someone. Little do they know, two extremely bemused Miami-Dade detectives, along with Serge's longtime nemesis Detective Mahoney, are in fact literally steps behind them the whole time...along with a gang of other oddballs (a sleazy attorney, a thinly disguised "Dog the Bounty Hunter", Serge's very angry wife). Madness of a uniquely Floridian & definitely deadly kind is sure to follow.

  • Holly
    2019-04-18 15:34

    Serge and his perpetually-baked compadre, Coleman, have been driving up and down the Sunshine State for ages — seeing the sights, having wild times, blowing their minds away through the judicious use and misuse of happy fun chemicals…(I will never look at Home Depot or Walgreen's the same way again!) and gleefully doing away with any criminal type folks that Serge decides need a good lesson.And Serge has met a LOT of people in need, as the monstrous body count he’s left in his wake can attest. So much so that there’s now a massive, statewide manhunt after him. Things look pretty grim for Serge and Coleman — He's trying to revive his fugitive themed travel website, escape an imaginary dragnet, and deal with a "gift" from an old flame. But, as with all of Tim Dorsey’s funny and homicidal romps through Florida, nothing is as simple as it sounds.

  • Doug
    2019-04-01 20:44

    Need a quick fix of madcap lunacy? Then Tim Dorsey is your guy. Serge and his stoner sidekick Coleman are up to their usual zany escapades. Serge's applications of his perception of "justice" seem a little less graphic this time out - otherwise not much is different from thier other adventures. As always, there is a little more here than meets the eye - beneath the slapstick humor there is more subtle and cerebral humor for those who take the time to look. All in all not a bad way to spend a weekend.