Read My African Safari by Kim L. Capehart Online

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GhanaSet in the humble surroundings of West Africa, it is a land of modest scenery and wondrous people; a land of primitive cultures rich in spirituality; a land of dances and prayers that reveal the essence of the Ghanaian spirit; a land of meager survival and exultant life.My African Safari brings to life Kim Capehart's eye-opening account of his experiences in this anciGhanaSet in the humble surroundings of West Africa, it is a land of modest scenery and wondrous people; a land of primitive cultures rich in spirituality; a land of dances and prayers that reveal the essence of the Ghanaian spirit; a land of meager survival and exultant life.My African Safari brings to life Kim Capehart's eye-opening account of his experiences in this ancient land as a modern medical intern. Exploring a culture free from the rules and convictions of modern society, Capehart's education begins in the hospital and continues in the hearts, minds and souls of the people he helped....

Title : My African Safari
Author :
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ISBN : 9781571971654
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 96 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

My African Safari Reviews

  • Liralen
    2019-05-04 00:14

    As we traveled through the path, I got to see the real African society. With the exception of them running around naked, I found it exactly as I imagined it and similar to what was displayed on television. (23)I was poking through the Africa section of the library, feeling guilty because I already had an unwieldy armful of books, I hadn't made it all the way through my library list yet (read: I'd be adding more books to that armful), and I had quite a long walk home with a heavy bag ahead of me. And yet...I cannot resist the siren call of books...so I picked this one up, figuring that it was short and light and wouldn't add much to my load. It's about a medical volunteer in Ghana, I reasoned; it might be interesting.You'd think I would have learned my lesson by now, but let's face it: Some lessons I am just not interested in learning.So. This book.Look, I understand that Ghana today is very different than it was even twenty years ago. The world is very different than it was twenty years ago. But yeesh. The author comes off as deeply, painfully naive at times. The writing's not very good, which doesn't help -- a mishmash of poorly fleshed out anecdotes and history lessons that remind me of a report I wrote on Sudan...when I was ten. But he also has this very strong perception of Africa in general, and Ghana in particular, as Other: What other African country is less known than Ghana? I don't mean any disrespect of Ghana, but it isn't widely known like other countries in Africa. (3)I know the Internet has made it a lot easier, since this book was published, to find out about other cultures, but come on.So off he goes to Africa -- having picked Ghana because it was less developed than, say, Egypt or South Africa, but feeling at the end that he knows what village life is anywhere in Africa -- as a volunteer. He comments that the villagers didn't want him to take photographs in the village (of their houses, etc.); he interprets that as an expression of shame that they live as they do, and reassures them that there's nothing shameful about it, but he also takes every chance to comment on the inadequacy of his quarters, of hospital resources, of village housing, of food. (And he wonders why they're wary of Americans taking photos?)To his credit, he's aware that he's not the perfect choice of volunteer: His training amounts to a year of dental school, and there are no doctors in the hospital he's placed in. He ends up providing little treatment that the nurses wouldn't provide on their own (though he is able to correct some misunderstandings). That's not his fault, of course, but it struck me, when he was asked to deliver a baby, that he was probably the least equipped person around to do so: He had the fancy textbooks, but chances are excellent that there were plenty of women in the vicinity who had given birth, or assisted at a birthing, or learned from their female relatives.One thing that did strike me as very interesting, and a lost opportunity for more detail: He mentions at one point that he has arthrogryposis and spent some time talking with youth in Ghana about disability and explaining that yes, people with disabilities could succeed and so on and so forth (which, good for him). I wonder, though, whether he'd have been able to say the same had he not been adopted from Korea to the U.S.? I don't know enough about the way disability is treated in South Korea (the only thing I can think of is Emily Rapp's experience there) to really have a grasp on the answer there, but, well, feels very much like a matter of circumstance.I wish he'd talked more about that; more visibility seems particularly useful. But generally the book was just...unexceptional and expected.If my experiences were mondane [sic], then you wouldn't be reading and I wouldn't have written this book, right? (xvii)Well, I did read it. And he did write it. But that's as far as I can agree.